Kurkuri Bhindi – Crunchy 3-Ingredient Okra

kurkuri_bhindi_pakistani

There are certain Urdu words that I really enjoy saying, those that sound exactly like what they mean. Kurkuri, that delightful word for crunchy and crispy is one of them. The first time my daughter had this Kurkuri Bhindi she was 3 years old and we were visiting my parents in Karachi. Her Nano had made this bhindi and Zara upon trying them said “these sticks are yummy!” It then occurred to me that my daughter had never had Okra except for its cornmeal battered deep fried incarnation. As yummy as the Deep Fried Okra was that way it was far too much work (and oil) for my liking.
kurkuri_bhindi_pakistani

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Spicy Whole Roasted Cauliflower

I often think about what it means to blog about food, about Pakistani food specifically. A part of me feels that I should keep recipes alive, carrying them forth in their unaltered state, preserving them for generations to come. The reality is that I cannot do that even if I wanted to. My culinary journey is very much shaped by my mother who if you ever meet her you would know is an immensely practical person. I cannot recall her ever saying she would spend hours slaving over a stove to get the onions browned just the way her grandmother did or that any recipe was sacrosanct because of who gave it to her. Adapt, make it easy, and make it work. That seems to be her approach to cooking and it is that philosophy that makes up my culinary DNA.

spicy whole roasted cauliflower

spicy whole roasted cauliflower

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Pakistani Murgh Palak (Spinach and Chicken)

murgh palak

Jump to the Pakistani Murgh Palak Recipe

Moment of truth time folks: Pakistani food is hard, sorry Pakistani food can be hard. Not because of the techniques,  but because of the time. So much damn time. Now of course there are great short cuts, but for an anxious hovering over her food kinda cook like me it can feel exhausting. That is what makes this hearty Murgh Palak so so perfect, there is no slow cooking of onions, no waiting for flavours to develop. Once the chicken is done you’re done. No garnishing required either. Just pick up your roti, or ladle the Murgh Palak over your rice and eat. 

murgh palak

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Sheer Khurma & Eid Eats 2016!

sheer khurma

Eid Eats 2016 is here!!! I am so thrilled to be co-hosting this events with blogger buddies Henna (My Ninja Naan) and Asiya (Chocolate & Chillies). What is Eid Eats you may ask? Well it is a fun round up of Eid recipes from our blogger friends world over. The recipes usually range from traditional to non traditional with a common theme of deliciousness. Blogger friends check back here for the how tos and don’t forget to use the hashtag #EidEats2016! My wonderful readers can see what everyone else is bringing to the table at the bottom of the post. Please do keep checking back as recipes will continue to be added over the next three days!

Eid-Eats-2016

I had initially thought of making something more ‘creative’ but then I decided to hold on to that thought and instead offer to you Sivaiyan/Sheer Khurma, the vermicelli & milk dessert that is almost compulsory on Eid-ul-Fitr. My Mamas Sivaiyan – or Sheer Khurma if we are going to be technical here – comes together in fifteen minutes and never ever have I had a bite and thought “How could I make this better?” For me it is just not possible. Her secret? A piece of mithai (traditional sweet dessert). One piece of qalaqand which is readily available at Pakistani/Indian stores goes a long way in adding real depth to what can sometimes be an underwhelming dessert. If you don’t have it don’t fret: my other favourite ingredient Condensed Milk does some delicious good here. 

sheerkhurma2

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Sabzi Raita – Mixed Veggies in Yogurt

I have a well documented love for raita, that savory yogurt accompaniment to a meal. Ideally I’d have it straight up with roti (flatbread) or rice, but I hear it is supposed to be a condiment. This raita is one my mother learnt from my aunt and can I say it was just love at first bite. I love serving it with a simple pea pilaf or my chickpea pilaf. Now that I think about it, it would go well with Tehri too. Really folks – what does raita not go well with? 

Sabzi Raita - Yogurt w Stir fried Veggies

Anyway, the key, and this is absolutely important is that you stir fry the veggies on high heat to get a nice char. I advise you to keep your windows open and exhaust vent on high. Also season season season. As the raita sits it does get yummier, but the veggies also tend to suck up a little salt, so please adjust before serving!

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